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About Mahale


Mahale is an evolutionary triumph, where the clock seems to have stopped early, at the right time. For man - part fish, part forest animal - it couldn't be more sublime.

There are few places left on earth that might rightfully be called Eden, and the Mahale Mountains is one of them. The mountains soar to 8,000 feet above the clear waters of Lake Tanganyika, which at 420 miles long and 30 miles wide, is a veritable inland sea. The nearest road is almost 100kms away, and that is the most minor of tracks.

The slopes of the Mahale Mountains rise behind camp, home to the world's largest known population of chimpanzees. Within hiking distance is one such group of 60. Every day you can venture out into this deep and magical forest to observe them, our closest relatives, as they groom, wrestle and forage across the leafy floor.

Mahale is a physical place, but strangely undemanding. Perhaps because it seems to have been created for Great Apes; figs, flowers, sun, shade, water.

The forest itself is special, with eight other species of primate, shyer forest mammals, birds, butterflies, giant vines and waterfalls. And if a day’s ‘chimping’ isn’t enough, you can take a gentle forest hike, go fishing or kayak along the lake shore.

Mahale is a physical place, but strangely undemanding. Perhaps because it seems to have been created for Great Apes; figs, flowers, sun, shade, water.

Hike in the stunning tropical forest that covers the slopes of the mountains. Its home to nine different species of primate, including the chimpanzee. The 'M' group live in the mountains close to camp, and have become habituated to human presence over two decades. Read more...


  

 

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